What can I get out of ACP?

Membership in ACP offers several benefits, including:

  • Regular chapter meetings with professional presentations by experts on subjects selected by members,
  • Personal networking with other local ACP members,
  • Knowledge you can use to protect your family in the event of a disaster,
  • National networking with ACP subject matter experts in various emergency and contingency planning specialties,
  • Continuing Education Units granted through attendance at ACP Chapter meetings, training seminars and conferences,
  • ACP resources to help identify and transfer technologies useful in contingency planning,
  • Quarterly Association newsletter, The ACP Sentinel,
  • Major discounts on annual ACP International Symposiums, and
  • Recognition as a member of a professional, international organization.

What are the membership requirements?

Membership in the Association of Continuity Professionals is open to anyone interested in contingency planning. Our members are primarily drawn from business and government organizations. Any number of individuals belonging to an organization is eligible for ACP membership. Members are accorded voting privileges in ACP affairs.

To ensure a high degree of professionalism, members are required to sign the ACP Code of Ethics (as detailed on the Membership Application) and agree to be bound by its provisions.

What is ACP attempting to accomplish?

ACP's Vision is to foster continued professional growth and development in effective contingency and business resumption planning.

Does ACP have a profit motive?

No. ACP is staffed by volunteers, and its 501C(6) tax code status designates it as a non-profit organization.

How does ACP relate to other disaster and emergency organizations?

ACP has formal partnerships with other organizations such as: American Red Cross, Association of State Flood Plain Managers, Central US Earthquake Consortium, Department of Justice, Electric Power Research Institute, Institute for Business and Home Safety, National Conference of State Legislatures, National Emergency Managers Association, and National Institute for Urban Research and Rescue.

ACP also works closely with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) on Project Impact, the Department of Energy, the US Geological Survey, and the International City and County Managers Association

How large is ACP, and how long has it been around?

ACP currently has 17 chapters and more than 1000 members worldwide. It was formally organized as a non-profit organization in 1984.

How can I join ACP if there's no local chapter in my area?

You may join as an Unaffiliated General Member if you are located 50 or more miles from an ACP chapter. The ACP currently has more than 80 such members.

If enough interest exists in your area, you may want to start a local chapter. To initiate this process, access the ACP International web site and select Chapter Services.